Modern Man is Obsolete [Signed with TLS to William Safire; prev. Tex McCrary Copy]. Norman Cousins.
Modern Man is Obsolete [Signed with TLS to William Safire; prev. Tex McCrary Copy]
Modern Man is Obsolete [Signed with TLS to William Safire; prev. Tex McCrary Copy]

Modern Man is Obsolete [Signed with TLS to William Safire; prev. Tex McCrary Copy]

Very Good / No Dust Jacket. Item #5942

New York: The Viking Press, 1945. First Edition. Signed by the author to journalist William Safire on front pastedown in 1976 with inscription "For Bill Safire - Who puts me deep in his debt by knowing that it* even existed. With admiration, Norman Cousins. June 5, 1976. *(We may be starting something with a double inscription.)" Cousins is referring to a gift inscription on front free endpaper from C.L. Mortimer (?) to Safire's mentor Tex McCrary which reads "Tex, Please read if you have not already do so [sic]. C.L. Mortimer x(?) Oct 14 - 1946)." Additional brief typed signed letter on Cousins's Saturday Review stationary thanking Safire for the autograph request laid in.

Octavo; 59pp. Blue cloth-covered boards with gilt lettering. Missing dust jacket. Boards worn at corners and spine ends, with fading to lettering down spine. Front hinge cracked at title page exposing mesh, but binding still secure. Page number references in pen on title page with a couple unobtrusive marginal brackets and a couple underlines in text.

An expansion of Cousins's editorial from the Saturday Review, which first ran only twelve days after the atomic bomb dropped over Hiroshima, wherein he considers humanity's place in the newly-birthed Atomic Age.

Tex McCrary and his wife Eugenia "Jinx" Falkenburg's morning show on New York's WEAF radio helped establish and popularize the talk show format. Safire counted both as early mentors, having worked for them as a researcher at the New York Herald Tribune, and it was under their watch that Safire took his famous photo of Nixon and Krushchev's "kitchen debate," with Jinx--one of the few, if only, female reporters there--in the shot's background and on a staged "typical American house" built by one of McCrary's clients.

Price: $50.00