Recreations of a Physician [with ALS to Samuel Courtauld and two original Horace translations] [Dickers & Son London binding]. A. Stuart M. Chisholm.
Recreations of a Physician [with ALS to Samuel Courtauld and two original Horace translations] [Dickers & Son London binding]
Recreations of a Physician [with ALS to Samuel Courtauld and two original Horace translations] [Dickers & Son London binding]
Recreations of a Physician [with ALS to Samuel Courtauld and two original Horace translations] [Dickers & Son London binding]
Recreations of a Physician [with ALS to Samuel Courtauld and two original Horace translations] [Dickers & Son London binding]
Recreations of a Physician [with ALS to Samuel Courtauld and two original Horace translations] [Dickers & Son London binding]

Recreations of a Physician [with ALS to Samuel Courtauld and two original Horace translations] [Dickers & Son London binding]

Very Good. Item #001029

New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1914. First Edition. Signed handwritten letter tipped in at contents page by the author to industrialist and art collector Samuel Courtauld, with one handwritten and one printed translation of Horace tipped in at pages 159 and 162, respectively.

Octavo; vii, 328 pages. Rebound by Dickers & Son London with their stamp at verso top of front free endpaper. Three quarter blue leather over blue cloth with gilt rules and lettering. Marbled endpapers with gilt top edges. Boards lightly edgeworn with rubbing to corners and down joints. Covers open a bit shakily, but are secure. Binding is sound and pages unmarked.

Author's letter to Courtauld reads:

Dear Sir:-- I have perused with delight your collection of the Odes, and regret not having seen it earlier. However, you have given me some hours of pure pleasure for which I am grateful. I have found some of my favorites and many excellent versions that were new to me. // I have not yet read them entirely, but for my own pleasure, and yet I wonder where you got the text for the 15th verse of the Quis Desiderio // "num vanae redeat sanguis imagini" // which I have never seen. Maclean (?) and all my texts have the verse // non vanae redeat --” etc. // with a period instead of a ? at the end of the 18th verse. The latter version was evidently also the one used by the translator, Lord Lytton // I am enclosing with the hope that they will please you, the Solvitur Aeris, unrhymed, and the Donec Gratus, which I have recently done into Archilochian and Asclepiadean. Thanking you for the courtesy of your letters and the book, I am with respect, yours truly A.S.M. Chisolm.” As above, his translations, one handwritten and one clipped from an apparent magazine publication, are tipped in later in the book.

Courtauld was an English industrialist, whose company, among other things, developed and marketed rayon as a silk substitute. He was a noted art collector, especially of the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists. He founded the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, and set up an acquisitions fund for the National Gallery and Tate Modern in London to build their collections of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist paintings.

Price: $75.00

See all items by