Khol Divre Ha-Torah: A Vocabulary of the Pentateuch; Containing All the Words of the Five Books in Their Primitive Forms, with an English Translation; Followed by an Alphabetical Index of the Hebrew Words, with References to the Page Where Each May Be Found in the Vocabulary, Designed as a Class-Book, and at the Same Time to Answer the Purpose of a School Dictionary, to Which Is Prefixed a Synopsis of Hebrew Grammar, to Facilitate the Study for Beginners. Jacob Mendes de Solla.
Khol Divre Ha-Torah: A Vocabulary of the Pentateuch; Containing All the Words of the Five Books in Their Primitive Forms, with an English Translation; Followed by an Alphabetical Index of the Hebrew Words, with References to the Page Where Each May Be Found in the Vocabulary, Designed as a Class-Book, and at the Same Time to Answer the Purpose of a School Dictionary, to Which Is Prefixed a Synopsis of Hebrew Grammar, to Facilitate the Study for Beginners.

Khol Divre Ha-Torah: A Vocabulary of the Pentateuch; Containing All the Words of the Five Books in Their Primitive Forms, with an English Translation; Followed by an Alphabetical Index of the Hebrew Words, with References to the Page Where Each May Be Found in the Vocabulary, Designed as a Class-Book, and at the Same Time to Answer the Purpose of a School Dictionary, to Which Is Prefixed a Synopsis of Hebrew Grammar, to Facilitate the Study for Beginners.

Very Good. Item #5748

Philadelphia: Printed for the Author by Collins, 1865. 12mo; ix, [x], 11-152pp. Gray paper-covered boards with brown leather spine. Boards edgeworn with a 2" x 2.5" loss to paper at bottom back exposing board, chipping along edges of leather, and some general smudging to surface. Hinges cracked with some distress along gutter, but boards still solidly secure. Foxing to endpapers with some toning to interior. Page binding is sound and pages unmarked.

Guide to Hebrew grammar for students of the Pentateuch. Jacob Mendes de Solla came from a family full of rabbinical and scholarly forebears going back to the ninth century. De Solla first came to America in 1858 and became head of a congregation in Richmond, Virginia. He travelled and taught throughout the United States, and helped found the Temple Emanuel of Denver, which would be his last post. According to his obituary, he later "abandoned his religious belief and announced himself opposed to all religion, [publishing] a pahmplet entitled 'The Fallacies of Religion: Its Delusions and Evils." He spent his post-religious life teaching languages.

This copy most recently from the personal library of journalist and language writer William Safire.

[Levine 303].

Price: $400.00