Jet: June 22, 1961 Issue, Vol XX, No. 9: Charlayne Hunter-Gault Cover Feature [signed]. John H. Johnson, ed. and publisher.
Jet: June 22, 1961 Issue, Vol XX, No. 9: Charlayne Hunter-Gault Cover Feature [signed]
Jet: June 22, 1961 Issue, Vol XX, No. 9: Charlayne Hunter-Gault Cover Feature [signed]
Jet: June 22, 1961 Issue, Vol XX, No. 9: Charlayne Hunter-Gault Cover Feature [signed]
Jet: June 22, 1961 Issue, Vol XX, No. 9: Charlayne Hunter-Gault Cover Feature [signed]
Jet: June 22, 1961 Issue, Vol XX, No. 9: Charlayne Hunter-Gault Cover Feature [signed]
A telling snapshot in time of a Black woman and professional journalist in a world of segregation, racial protest, foregrounded sexism—and energy for progress on all fronts.

Jet: June 22, 1961 Issue, Vol XX, No. 9: Charlayne Hunter-Gault Cover Feature [signed]

Very Good. Item #9673

Chicago: Johnson Publishing Company, June 22, 1961 Issue, Vol XX, No. 9. Signed on cover by featured journalist Charlayne Hunter [-Gault]. Saddle-stapled issue of weekly periodical; 14.5x10.5cm; 66pp. Coated three-color cover shows mild signs of careful handling; pages whole, without folds, tears, or marks.

Charlayne Hunter—whom we now know as Charlayne Hunter-Gault—signed the cover just above her own name in typeface. She is covered in two stories within the issue (see photos): one about her academic success at the University of Georgia, the other about her pioneering arrival in Kentucky journalism: "Charlayne Hunter, who, with Hamilton Holmes, was the first Negro to attend the University of Georgia . . . has been hired for the summer by a white newspaper, the Louisville (Ky.) Times."

The entire issue presents an exceptionally multi-faceted picture of the contradictory world in which Hunter-Gault had to fight for career success: Freedom Riders, racist propaganda, and racial violence are the top "hard" news stories in the issue. Sexism is rampant: her physical looks are mentioned whenever she is, the centerfold of the issue has a centerfold, and skin-lightening cream gets a full-page ad. But still, but still, the world only spins forward, and Hunter-Gault was one of the turbo-chargers in that forward progress.

Hunter-Gault’s pioneering role in integrated education, which this issue of Jet highlights, was the subject of Calvin Trillin’s 1964 history, “An Education in Georgia: The Integration of Charlayne Hunter and Hamilton Holmes.”.

Price: $65.00